• The Fourth Revolution
    The latest developments in mankind’s industrial evolution combine digital, physical and biological technologies in a manner never seen before. Veronica Carvalho examines how new tech will influence consumer shopping habits and its impact on the retail environment.

    Veronica Carvalho
    September 2018
     

    About two centuries ago, humans learned how to control water and steam and use it in power machinery. It was the first industrial revolution.  The second industrial revolution in the late 1800’s, unleashed the power of electricity and mass production.  Electronics and IT began the third industrial revolution in the late 1990’s when digital came along to replace analog, electronic and mechanical devices.

    Now we are living a new fourth industrial revolution. Swift, deep, more impactful than ever before, it combines digital, physical and biological technologies.  It’s not only self-driving cars or  artificial intelligence that can emulate humans, it’s also humans carrying chips and synthetic biology bringing Man and machine together. If the previous revolutions transformed processes, the fourth Industrial revolution will transform the way the human being sees themselves and function.

     

  • Brands' C-Suite Exodus
    An unprecedented number of consumer packaged goods CEO's are stepping down in the face of changing consumer attitudes towards brands and the rising preference for private label. David Merrefield names and analyzes the motivations behind these high-profile departures.
    David Merrefield
    September 2018
     

    The CEO of any company that has experienced declining revenues for a while may be in jeopardy. When an entire business sector is in decline, many CEOs may be in jeopardy.

    The latter is certainly the case when it comes to national-brand manufacturers of consumables.

    In the past couple of years, no fewer than 16 CPG CEOs have vacated their corner offices. Conspicuous among them are Denise Morrison at Campbell Soup, Paul Grimwood at Nestle USA and Ken Powell at General Mills. And the list continues to grow. Indra Nooyi of PepsiCo recently announced she’s stepping down.

    And it’s possible that we’ve seen only the beginning. Activist investors are now demanding major changes at 40 more CPG manufacturing companies worldwide, changes such as CEO replacement, asset sales or mergers.While the great outdoors doesn’t fit normally into our view of grocery and home and health retailing, there is a lot happening and there are lessons to be learned.

     

  • Real Ingredients Mean Real Sales
    As more consumers adopt healthy lifestyles, ingredients like sodium benzoate are being replaced by natural additives like raisin juice and vinegar. Dr. Kantha Shelke explains that it’s not just food. Dietary supplements, pet food and even skincare products are all getting a natural ingredients makeover.

    Kantha Shelke
    July 2018
     

    Whether it’s food, personal care, dietary supplements, or even pet foods, one trend is apparent.  It’s the rise of ingredients derived from real foods instead of highly processed and fabricated ingredients.

    Shopper preference for ingredients from recognizable foods instead of mysterious chemical names is driving consumer packaged goods manufacturers to dump artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives… and revamp products with ingredients with familiar names. Consumers interpret real foods as naturally wholesome and love the concept that nutrients and other health benefits are coming from foods as intended by nature. As marketing stories go, they don’t get much better than real food ingredients.

    Synthetic colors are swapped for fruit and vegetable powders, and extracts of turmeric, spirulina, beets, and purple carrots that people trust.

     

  • Top Retailers Bring Adventure to New Categories in Store Brands
    The great outdoors is a land of store brands, led by chains like Cabela’s and Bass Pro Shops. After their $5 billion merger last year, Christopher Durham explores how these retailers use their own brands of gear, clothing, and even boats to make this segment a powerful contributor to the world of private label.
    Christopher Durham
    July 2018
     

    While the great outdoors doesn’t fit normally into our view of grocery and home and health retailing, there is a lot happening and there are lessons to be learned.

    Let’s start with Bass Pro Shops. In 2017, it closed a nearly $5 billion deal to acquire its rival, Nebraska-based Cabela's. The buyout, in the works for more than a year, brings Cabela’s 82 stores in the U.S. and Canada into the Bass Pro Shops fold. Bass Pro Shops currently operates 95 Outdoor World stores in the U.S. and Canada.

    The newly merged retailer now owns a powerhouse portfolio of private label brands including Cabela’s clothing, camping and fly fishing gear, Tracker boats, Ascend, the Bass Pro Shop brand, Johnny Morris Reels, Natural Reflections, Offshore Angler, Uncle Buck’s, White River, Worldwide Sportsman, XPS, XTS, and the iconic Redhead brand of outdoor apparel.

PLMALive! Archives:
the Best of the Year Past
Summertime Is Relaxation Time

Yes, summertime is time for relaxation and catching up on some of the things that you missed during those hectic days at the office or traveling. PLMA Live understands and suggests two newsdesk reports that will help you catch up. First, there's PLMALive's report on Nielsen's study about future store brands growth. Second is Costco and their strategy to deal with e-commerce.

What Do Consumers Really Want?

Consumers are unpredictable, so it isn't easy to keep up with the latest product trends. Tim Simmons interviews Tom Vierhile, Innovation Insights Director at GlobalData. Vierhile says this year consumers are full of contradictions as they decide what new products they want to buy.

What's the Future of Online Shopping?

Take a look at Great Britain, where online grocery retailing has been growing for two decades. Justin King, former CEO at Sainsbury's, one of Britain's largest supermarket retailers, says that while most shoppers there use online to buy groceries, they aren't abandoning brick and mortar stores.

Top Retailers Bring Adventure to New Categories in Store Brands

The great outdoors is a land of store brands, led by chains like Cabela’s and Bass Pro Shops. After their $5 billion merger last year, Christopher Durham explores how these retailers use their own brands of gear, clothing, and even boats to make this segment a powerful contributor to the world of private label.

Science and Research: Real Ingredients Mean Real Sales

As more consumers adopt healthy lifestyles, ingredients like sodium benzoate are being replaced by natural additives like raisin juice and vinegar. Dr. Kantha Shelke explains that it’s not just food. Dietary supplements, pet food and even skincare products are all getting a natural ingredients makeover.

Fermentation Adds Fizz - and Buzz ‑ to Products

Kombucha, Korean-inspired kimchi and even beauty care products are rising to the top of the food industry headlines. It’s all about fermentation, which adds good gut bacteria inside and absorption efficacy outside. Dr. Kantha Shelke explains how fermentation appeals to health-minded consumers, and the way it can help store brands manufacturers.

A Toast to Private Label Wine
Increased wine sales are nothing to sniff at. Discounters like Lidl and Aldi are making store brand wines not only acceptable, but preferable for price and quality. Judith Kolenburg in Amsterdam previews PLMA’s 2018 Salute to Excellence Wine Awards where more than 30 retailers received recognition for private label achievements.
 Major Trends at PLMA's International Trade Show

Direct from PLMA’s 2018 “World of Private Label,” what are the trends and products which dominated this year’s show? Join news anchor Jodi Daley and PLMA president Brian Sharoff for an inside look at the exhibition. Special reports from PLMA’s European team of analysts and commentators. Plus, a preview of PLMA’s 2018 Salute to Excellence Wine Awards and coverage of one of the latest techniques in product development – fermentation.

Big Brands Struggle with New Media

Big national brand marketers now realize that their long-standing advertising strategies aren’t working well in the new media world. Stuart Elliott, who was the advertising columnist for the New York Times, says “everything is changing” in advertising and the big brands are struggling to reach consumers with their ad messages.

The Retail Race for the Bottom

Dollar stores, discounters, major supermarket chains and e-commerce are battling each other for sales to consumers at the bottom of the economic ladder. The prize is big profits and it is attracting Aldi, Lidl, Walmart and many others. Join news anchor Jodi Daley and PLMA president Brian Sharoff as they analyze the players, the market and the consumers.